www.flickr.com
Click here to access this blog in a mobile version.

23 January 2012

The Future Belongs to the Curious

This morning I read a post by Ewan McIntosh, titled "Design Thinking 2: Immersion - don't give students a problem to solve..."

I immediately thought about our upcoming Exhibition with the Senior Primary Class at ISOCS, and the conversations some of us have been having about its structure, guidance and format.

Here are the 3 videos included in the post, along with 2 others that are part of the Brisbane Design Thinking series. Some of them may look like they're aimed at teachers, but watch them with the understanding that we are all teachers, and we are all learners.


The Future Belongs to the Curious from Skillshare on Vimeo.
From the moment we open our eyes it fuels our existence. We are on a mission to remind everyone to never lose your sense of curiosity or wonder. Long live learning!


Uploaded by TEDxTalks on Nov 18, 2011
Ewan McIntosh is CEO of NoTosh Limited, a startup that works with creative industries on the one hand, and then takes the processes, attitudes and research gained from working on those projects to the world of education, providing schools, districts and Governments all around the world with ideas, inspiration and research on how to better engage teens. Ewan and his team are all about engaging people, whether they're voters, customers or kids in a classroom.




Design Thinking Brisbane from Danielle Carter on Vimeo.
Introduction Video on Design Thinking in School- working with Ewan McIntosh and Tom Barrett on action learning project 2011.



Immersion from Danielle Carter on Vimeo.
First stage in design thinking process.



Synthesis from Danielle Carter on Vimeo.
The second stage in the Design Thinking process.


"The key to success, and the differentiator compared to other problem-based learning approaches? Students, not teachers, work out the challenge they want to solve." (link)


This is a hot topic in the PYP Exhibition world. What would our Exhibition be like if the students planned it all?  Would the allowed  6 weeks be enough time (and what could we do if it wasn't)? What might such an Exhibition look like? How would we record it?